Semester Schedule

Schedule of Meetings and Readings

Week 1

Tuesday, January 28 Introducing Taste as a Critical Category
 Raymond Williams, “Taste.” In Keywords.

Thursday, January 30 Aesthetic Theories of Taste
 Carolyn Korsmeyer, “Taste.” In The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics, 3rd ed. Gaut, Berys, and Dominic Lopes, eds. (pp. 257-266) Routledge, 2013.
 David Hume, Of the standard of taste, and other essays. MacMillan Publishing Company, 1965 (1757).
 Immanuel Kant, “Critique of Aesthetic Judgment.” In Critique of judgement. Edited by Nicholas Walker. Oxford University Press, 2007 (1790).

Week 2

Tuesday, February 4 Sick Tastes and the Degenerate Race
 Friedrich Nietzsche, Chapters 2 and 8 in Beyond Good and Evil, trans. Walter Kaufmann. New York: Vintage, 1966 (1886).
 Max Nordau, “Friedrich Nietzsche” (excerpt); “The Dusk of Nations”; and “Symptoms.” In Degeneration [Entartung]. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska, 1993 (1892).

Thursday, February 6 Aesthete Theories of Taste
 Oscar Wilde. The decay of lying: A dialogue. Kegan Paul, Trench & Company, 1889.
 Supplemental Reading: Max Nordau, “Ego-Mania” in Degeneration; and Joris-Karl Huysman, Selections from Against nature. ([A rebours]. 1884).

Week 3

Tuesday, February 11 Social Theories of Taste: Consumption and Distinction
 Pierre Bourdieu, excerpts from Distinction: A social critique of the judgement of taste. Routledge, 2013.
 Thorstein Veblen, “Conspicuous Consumption,” “The Pecuniary Standard of Living” and “Pecuniary Canons of Taste” (The Theory of the Leisure Class: An Economic Study in the Evolution of Institutions [1899]). In The Portable Veblen. Viking Press, 1948.

Thursday, February 13 Bad Taste on the Bul’var: Introducing Poshlost’
 Vladimir Nabokov, “Philistines and Philistinism.” In Lectures on Russian Literature (1980): 309-14.
 Vladimir Nabokov, excerpt from Nikolai Gogol. New York: New Directions, 1944; and Strong Opinions. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1973.
 Gennadii Obatnin, “Two Hundred years of Poshlost: A Historical Sketch of the Concept.” In Understanding Russianness, ed. Risto Alapuro, et al. Routledge, 2014.
 Supplemental Reading: Svetlana Boym, “Nostalgia, Kitsch and Death.” In The Future of Nostalgia. Basic Books, 2001.

Week 4

Tuesday, February 18 Slap in the Face of Public Taste: The Russian Avant-garde
 Leon Trotsky, excerpt of Literature and Revolution (pp. 462-466). In Theories of Modern Art. Berkeley: University of California Press , 1968.
 Vladmir Mayakovsky, et al., “Slap in the Face of Public Taste” (1913), “We, Too, Want Meat!” (1914); “The LEF Program” (1923); David Burliuk et al., “Go to Hell!”; Sergei Tretiakov, “From Where to Where? (Futurism’s Perspectives).” In Anna Lawton and Herbert Eagle, eds. Words in Revolution: Russian Futurist Manifestoes, 1912-1928. New Academia, 2005.
Sergei Yutkevich, “We Prefer a Pinkerton Cover to the Concoctions of Picasso” (1922) In Kelly, Catriona, ed. Utopias: Russian modernist texts 1905-1940. Penguin Books, 1999.
Ÿ Svetlana Boym, excerpts from Common Places: Mythologies of Everyday Life in Russia. Harvard UP: 1994, pp. 29-40; 56-73; 88-93.
 Vladimir Lenin,“Against Futurism.” In The Lenin Anthology. WW Norton, 1975.

Thursday, February 20 The Frankfurt School on Mass Culture, Part II
Walter Benjamin, “Dream Kitsch”; “Some Remarks on Folk Art”; and “The work of art in the age of its technological reproducibility”; ” In The work of art in the age of its technological reproducibility, and other writings on media. Harvard University Press, 2008.
 Supplemental Reading: Leah Dickerman, “Lenin in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.” In Memory & Oblivion, pp. 1067-1073. Springer Netherlands, 1999.

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